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Episode 14: Conversation Transcript

Dydine 

Nice to see you.


Jordan   

Nice to see you too. Thanks so much for chatting with me today.


Dydine  

We're excited to have you.


Jordan  

Likewise, honestly, though, I always say like, so much they still need to talk for everyone so much that we all need to learn, right?


Alex   

No, we talked about maintaining that theme of being a student of life. And then the moment you think you know, everything is the moment that you stop growing. It's more like a universal thing.


Jordan   

100% You know, like always being that feedback. They always seem like a choice to do that. Yes. Definitely.


Dydine 

So how are you doing? How is England?


Jordan 

It's Brian Coker, my dog snoring, I have two dogs. Maybe I'll grab her in a minute to say Hi. If you hear her snoring at any point, please let me know, and I'll interrupt her. We always have to hit a reset button with my partner when she snores too loud at night.


Alex  

I'm sure somebody in the audience has a human story. 


Jordan  

How are you both doing? You're both in my hometown. I love it.


Dydine  

Yeah. Well, it's nice. Especially around this time of the year. It's perfect weather. It's like Fall until now so that's nice.


Jordan 

Perpetual Cardigan Weather.


Alex  

Yes. I appreciate it.


Dydine   

So to start, I'm going to ask you a few questions. How was your upbringing, and your growth? What was it like for you? 


Jordan 

I think I had an interesting upbringing. So I came into the world not under the best pretenses so my father had kids from a marriage before my mom and I had a half-brother who passed away of leukemia at age 16. And so at Cedar Sinai, and then I was born six months later in the same hospital. And so I think that's maybe kind of an abnormal story in terms of, you know, how babies kind of maybe come into fruition in terms of, you know, coming into the world. Not under like the best circumstances. But what's so interesting is that his name was Jeffrey and the last book you read was The Great Gatsby. And so he named me, Jordan. And then he also I have his initials. So Jeffrey Allen. So Jordan, Ashley and you know, my mom always said to me, like, it's so good that you know, you were born a daughter because I think it would have been really hard on your father had you been born a son? But it's interesting, I guess, maybe how that kind of shifted my perspective maybe, you know, kind of growing up and that you know, not that I was replacing a child. But anyways, it's kind of feeling like you're not really in the right place, maybe or like maybe like you're slightly misplaced. I think that definitely colored my upbringing. My parents got divorced. Yeah, it was I was a pretty sad kid. I'm being completely honest. If you know, I'm starting to unpack a lot of this. I'm in therapy right now. And I'm starting to unpack all of those in terms of the kind of like childhood fragmentation and how that plays into our relationships as adults and our perspectives and all of that. But the one thing I can say is that I always love doing it, I always love. I used to dance when I was really little, I did figure skating. And then I came to yoga. And that was a throughline that I would always return to in terms of different ways of expressing myself and expressing my body. And really just having the sense of not having to be anything for anyone, but just rather being present and myself.


Alex  

Yes, wow.

We've had conversations with people before about them using physicality as a way to express a lot of the stuff that's going on and there seems to be something very therapeutic with that. You know, I guess I used to play a lot of sports. I used to be a basketball player and on track, and I guess that was also kind of in the same realm. Right, right. And there's something it's about using your body in a way that is a kind of authority. The figures are very physical, very taxing, and very challenging, but yoga is as well. That's something that I would love to explore more. Yeah, so I guess, with yoga, what exactly was that? Yeah, like what was so expressive about it? What was the thing that connected you? Does that make sense?


Jordan  

First, it was an activity that actually did a lot with my mom, my mom was into yoga and I used to you know, go to class with her when I was really little, and it was something that I enjoyed doing with her. But then later, long, later, down the line, something that I wanted to just do on my own, and I think there's something really beautiful about kind of the anonymous practitioner. In not, when you're in a dance class, or when you maybe you're, if you're in a dance off of a kid, like you probably know, like a lot of the other kids or their friends or people you go to school with and with figure skating, it's also kind of like a tight-knit community. That I think one of the nice things about yoga and LA while because I like them so much yoga is that you can just go to a studio anonymously, and you can practice but then you're also in a room with other people and everyone has their own experiences and traumas and trials and tribulations and you're going through the shapes and modifying along the way making it easier, making it more challenging, but it's still you on the mat, but into like the collective experience that everyone is having, you know, their own journey. And I think that, to me, is what really resonates and it's something that I like to keep coming back to it's changed a little bit like I was just I'm older in terms of not only just being physical but also you know, there's seven other limbs of yoga as well. That I would say most people start off with the Austin or like the physical practice.


Dydine

I'm still back of the first with us when you're sharing your story in my head. I'm just like, you know, thinking like with your mom and all the stories that she was sharing with you a lot of the things that you found out about your brother, just like, and also, once we were saying it, I'm just imagining both parents not really be happy, they are happy but at the same time, they have this deep loss they've just experienced and, and so as you mentioned those are just what you were assigned. I mean, in my head, I'm just feeling like it's it was you know, they were sad and that's what was around you with the grief and they say that we as children. We kind of pick up on the feelings of others and everything that's happening around us. I'm wondering if that was something I smell you mentioned that you were in therapy and you realize over deep sadness you had it when you were picking it up.


Jordan   

Yeah, definitely, you know, my mom, and I've spoken really openly about it. And she says, you know, her whole pregnancy was spent in like the children's oncology ward of the hospital, you know, and in terms of, you know, helping my brother and then when he was briefly in remission, you know, taking care of him and the majority of the pregnancy was spent, you know, at the side of like a hospital bed. You know, even like the baby shower like there was this sense of just sadness in terms of timing and loss and everything. And yeah, I think that's pretty accurate in terms of, you know, I was planned. You know, they did decide what when they decided that they wanted to grow their family when you know when my brother was in remission, but still, it's kind of like, it feels in a way like I've always had this shadow. And I've never spoken about this before. But just when you said like, what was your childhood like? You know, it's weird to kind of grow up in a house. And see photos of a sibling that like you'll that you'll never meet or that you'll never kind of engage with, but that you have a connection with because they chose your name and which you know greatly I think shaped your identity in terms of like your namesake you know, and then having you know, two other you know, have siblings as well who very much to grow up with my, my hospital, they're like 20 and 21 years older than me, they're a lot older than me. And so, they had a whole huge, you know, childhood with him and then kind of like, I don't know if this new kid comes in and you know, we didn't grow up in the same house.


Dydine  

But that was the beginning of your life. It's not easy, especially if you don't choose to come and want to come here or not it is our choice, but I'm glad you're here today, sharing your testimony still strong and going through therapy, and doing everything you can to heal.


Jordan  

I don't think healing is linear. I actually think our whole adult life is about healing what happens in our childhood or healing? What's happened maybe in like our early adulthood, as I think, I think that's a huge part of existence, and I think it needs to be accepted more and in terms of yeah, in terms of, you know, there are different ways and there's different activities or spiritual beliefs or that I think will, of course, connect with like the individual, but I think it's something to acknowledge, you know, everyone, to varying degrees has loss and trauma, and that doesn't mean that we can't like move through it. And we can't support one another and respect one another by whichever way you decide to kind of take that on.


Alex   

Yeah, and you mentioned trauma. A few years ago, I was told by my godson, who stuttered, that trauma is trauma, regardless if it's this big, or if it's this way. And regardless of if somebody really relates to it or not, trauma is trauma and affects you in the way that it affects you particularly right I'm curious about dealing with trauma and helping not only yourself but others heal. Have you seen any sort of change in the dialogue, surrounding healing with trauma because it is such an abstract a lot of times have you seen in any change positive growth in those conversations?


Jordan   

So, I think what I've seen in like what I speak on is the introduction of like, yoga practice and meditation practice and how that can be an effective safety net, especially, and how that was a huge safety net, especially for the community I've been working with in Rwanda and growing with Kamera. It's an amazing organization. I'm so honored and proud to be partnered. With them for soldiers in yoga to be partnered with. and they support young women and young women's education in the eastern part of the country. And so just to like backtrack a little bit we've been working with them and, you know, soldiering yoga first operates that we will retreats included with a $500 donation that goes directly to our partners. And so when you travel with us to see firsthand like where your donation goes and the impact, and then you have a cultural immersion as well, but it didn't really seem fair to me about only, you know, one time a year that these women would have the opportunity to do yoga class. And so I was approached by Kamera to start our own teacher training program. So in 2019, I won and taught nine women who are the staff and also workers in the community and outcome era, had to teach yoga and then also, from there, they then culturally adopted it and made it applicable and appropriate for teen moms that they work with and also primary school students. And so I'd interviewed and I'd spoken to three of the teachers this was in 2021, this was this is part of my, my master's managing my Ph.D. because I'm a big, big nerd, but it was looking at yoga as an apartment practice and so they said to me that during the pandemic, when it was locked down, they weren't allowed to congregate together to do yoga classes. And they found a lot of resilience in having the self-practice and having been practicing and having been exposed to it and, and honestly, more so than yoga, it was meditation, and that's what offers a lot of relief. And, you know, gave them a place to sit and to feel and to be and to breathe. And what's so great about meditation is that you don't need anything. Even with yoga, you really don't need anything, you just need a little bit of space. The only thing you do need is time and we all have an abundance of time. Yes. For like two years. And so it was really good to hear that and that was a skill set that really Yeah, that really aligns with that. And that was something that they use to fight a lot of the, you know, sadness and anger and trauma from that period of time.


Dydine   

Yeah, absolutely. Especially because people wonder does a lot of fun No, with this history. So there are a lot of key events needed. And sometimes when you're going through traumatic events, you don't realize that you need healing. So it's like a breath of fresh air when you meet someone who can introduce you to ways and tools to heal, to begin your journey. And I don't remember giving him some of your work, and you realize that you were a journalist first and then you moved into the work of the nonprofit. How was your experience as a journalist and how was it? What was how and how you felt while doing it? And then how did you feel while doing the nonprofit work in the shift that happened between those two worlds?


Jordan  

I think, for me, it was really hard to just be a bystander and not take action. And that's a huge part of the journalism is that you stay neutral and you're able to report on the facts without putting so much of yourself into it and kind of staying, you know, objective. And I was living in debriefing Cambodia, and I was doing NGO coverage. And that was really hard to do because then you're learning about all these different organizations, for the most part, they're all doing incredible work. But some were maybe spread too thin or didn't have enough resources or funding to really support the individuals but they were they had taken on, you know, under their umbrella. And so I ended up moving back to New York and freelancing a little bit I was still writing but then I started teaching yoga as well. And then I saw that that didn't really align with me either just in terms of how like studios operate and it's super political. And you know, there's, I think, you know, yoga teacher training should be decentralized. I think it really is something that anyone can learn. You don't need 200 hours, you don't need to pay like $300, you know, to pay the rent or the overhead of a brick-and-mortar space. And more so I guess there are a lot of retreats happening. Maybe 2012, 2013 You know, and the retreats are going to places and destinations but there wasn't any kind of give back to me like if you can pay to go on a retreat you should be able to donate. And so we're bringing supplies. I'm not saying to make it like a mission trip, but it's a luxury. It's a luxury to be able to do that and a lot of people don't, you know, don't want to equate wellness with luxury but unfortunately, that's what it's become. It's a huge moneymaker. And my passion has always been, you know, girls' education, and young women's empowerment. That's always something that's, you know, really been, like, my heart cause and the thing that I hope to be able to support, you know, and however many you know, your they have and just creating a platform that yes, you can travel you can go to these places you can you know, learn about a country. I think education is the biggest heart opener, you know, we go to places that are your typical yoga retreat destinations that are post-conflict, places that are Wanda, we go to Cambodia, you get to meet and connect with these incredible people who have had all kinds of life experiences. And it's through that it's from the learning in the sharing in the conversation, not me then create you know, community and it's doing that that we've done support, you know, girls education.


Alex   

That is beautiful and maybe my naivety is showing but I had no idea that yoga was so political, as you said in that. I guess it doesn't make sense in that. If people equate yoga to luxury but I guess it doesn't make sense to just kind of like weigh in LA as well. That it won't be as accessible and that people will think okay if I need wellness, I'm gonna have to invest in this. I'm gonna have to talk to this person. I'm gonna have to, jump through all of these hoops when in reality, it should be accessible to everybody. It should be just, you just, you know, take five minutes out of your day, do some deep stretching, meditate. That's a form of wellness but it's kind of mind-boggling to me that it is not that simple.


Dydine  

No, it's not. It's not that simple.


Alex   

Maybe it is laid out that way.


Dydine   

Yeah, I mean, I mean, there's, there's YouTube. YouTube now has made it accessible for people to do it from home so you can watch someone you could listen to someone giving you instructions and you can be able to do it from home. But when it comes to studios, I think I think you're right. So it's a work from the actually the longest workout.


Jordan  

And yeah, that needs to change. I mean, thank goodness. Now, there are spaces that are you know, just donation dates, you know, yoga classes, or community classes, maybe with like newer teachers, but I think more so, it should be accessible. You shouldn't have to go so far to another neighborhood or another part of town to be able to have access to those. Unfortunately, it's still something that you need to like to cross the threshold even to like to have the awareness even to know about it. But I do think that part of the silver lining of being you know, in a lockdown for two years is that everything went online so people were able to connect in a very different way. You were then able to like take classes and teachers you know, all over the world. There's a ton of free content, which is incredible, but I also think it needs to be representative of it needs to be more encompassing and more diverse and more accessible for different bodies and different ethnicities, sexual orientations, like everything you know I think I think we're hopefully headed in the right way with that. But that's why my whole thing with like they are on the ground teacher training program is that I want to I want the teachers you know, there in Rwanda then it needs. It needs to come from within and it needs to come from people in the community because it's their magic that their students are going to connect with the most it shouldn't be about you know, me coming in as a Westerner and some American you know, teaching I want to be able to do this and walk away and not that they have, they have what they need, you know to teach a class or to teach meditation and then they can do they're put their own spin on it and dirty. No, make it true to them. 


Dydine   

I've tried, I'm a meditator and meditate and it's very, very healing. I would say it's, you know, tapping into your soul and you get to know yourself as you meditate. And with yoga, I'm still struggling but yeah, it's a very nice form of getting to know yourself and getting to know how you can operate in this world. And it does it can be physical, yes, but it's also internal work or a journey.


Dydine  

Yeah. So I'm glad that you're doing that. And, and definitely being able to just, you know, to touch so many people, even when you're not there because if you pay attention to teach they're going to you know, to keep teaching other people and that's because you have been there so that's thank you for the work that you're doing. And even when we're still in that aren't the people here who are going to be watching this? You can if you want to support Jordan and her work, please go to her bio. There's electricity, you can find ways to support her and her non-profit so that you can keep touching as many souls as much as you can. So yeah, I had one other question about when I was I think it was watching your YouTube talk, about, about healing. And you talked about a lot of things but there were moments where you talked about your healing journey. And I'm wondering, when did you know that you needed healing ? When did you find out like realize, oh, I need to take on this journey of healing?


Jordan  

That's a good question. I think at age 23 like 10 years ago. Yeah, I felt too much of the weight of a lot of past traumas. I was in an abusive relationship that I like just gotten out of maybe 4 or 5 months prior. And then I'd like run off to Cambodia to like to do journalism and I came back to LA and then I remember it was October and I was just so down. And like the bottom of the bottom of health in terms of just feeling an immense amount of depression. And then sitting with my mom and my god mom on like the steps outside of my dad's house and just them saying like you need like something needs to like a shift in you. And it took the time I ended up random lady. really random Oh, my god mom. I love her. She's great. Kathy. She also Yeah, she's great. Anyways, she's a mountain climber. Um, she also likes has been working Yeah. That was kind of cool. Peter Greenberg. She's a producer on that, like Greenberger documentary, like full circles. I always looked up to her. And I decided like that in there. I'm like, I'm gonna go climb Everest.


I decided I'm like, I'm gonna go do this. I had been offered a position and Bangkok and so I was like, I'm gonna go to Nepal, like the end of December into the new year, and then finish and then like, also go to Bangkok, Thailand. And so I'm not a hiker I'm like, I have asthma. I didn't like, you know, everyone's like you trained for like month and months on this I'm like, that will like it kind of went on the tempo a little bit like on an incline.


Jordan  

Everyone's like did you train or like a month on this I'm like never like it kind of you know, went on the treadmill a little bit like I just decided to like go, and like I didn't know anyone and it was like a group trip. I was the youngest by a longshot and, you know, canceled couples and like, old man and it was great and I loved it and it was the step towards rediscovering myself and getting an identity getting a sense of autonomy because, you know, I just I did it and there wasn't really any reasoning or it wasn't like a life dream or life poll. It was just kind of an I'm always very fly the fly by the seat of my pants kind of person. But that to me was a big, life-changing moment.



Dydine  

This is the next step for me and I'm going to take risks. I'm going to take a leap of faith and I'm just going to climb that mountain. Yeah. And that's admirable as well. 


Alex  

Yes, a lot of us when we are faced with these like very low moments, have no idea what to do about them when we are we are given options or like even suggested that a lot of times we're afraid to take those leaps of faith and that's it's a very admirable area that you're like I'm gonna take this risk. You know, there are this far other options I have. Sure, but this is what I'm going to try to do. It's kind of extreme, but it's like I think it's a testament to what kind of person you are, and how you face adversity. Like in those moments. Not many people would choose to, you know, go mountain climbing. You know, that's a great thing. I love that. I


Dydine  

How did you feel when you came back?


Jordan  

from like on the decline? I was like one of the last people to like hit like base camp because I'm it's not like it was me and like, using the Bob. He must have had at least 50 years on me, right I'm the youngest but I do not like that I plan with affordable I finished up a little bit ahead of fall but I just never felt so accomplished. Like I did it even though like I struggled to like it pretty the whole thing was pretty arduous and horrible and not horrible. It was not the physically most challenging thing I've ever had to do. Not necessarily because it's like all off. It's like you're walking for like nine hours at a time which is like granted like I put myself in that position with no enforcement to do it. I do it for myself, but I definitely think from there and then move somewhere completely new. It was a great reset button because it really gave me a sense of independence. Oh yeah. Yeah,


Dydine  

I would say I will take him to one that has a lot of hills. He will start with the hills and


Jordan  

the land of 1000 hills.


Dydine  

I will take the to the volcanoes.


Alex  

I have a question though, kind of going back to helping these communities and so you've mainly focused within or with women. Right. Is that right?


Jordan  

So great. So we support and we're partnered with girls education initiatives on the ground, so it's a for the most part of like secondary to like middle school age. So I would say like 12 to maybe 16. And then during the teacher training program, so the first time was in Rwanda, and I'm actually hopefully knocking on wood going back in January back to Panera. They just opened a beautiful Leadership Center which I really can't wait to visit. But then part of my Ph.D. work is working with 15 and 16-year-olds amazi which means three people. The other definition people would know as Amazi “young woman in the High Atlas Mountains”, so I was there this summer with 16-year-olds in Morocco.


Alex  

So I'm curious if there's any what's the right way to say it. Are there any, any men who sort of what are the reactions from men with this? Because I know there's a lot of I'm saying this, I come from a background and do not like calling somebody out but men traditionally had a hard time with expression, with dealing with mental health and dealing with trauma. And anytime the conversation was brought up, it's usually met with like, just be a man just deal with it, and don't talk about it. It's just kind of like an unspoken rule and a lot of communities. So I'm curious like with your work maybe on like the peripherals, has there ever been any sort of, like positive reaction, or do you ever hear anything about that, or maybe an even like, transformative situation where someone's like, or man, maybe, you know, maybe I want to join in? Maybe I'm curious about that sort of growth in myself. Like, have you had any observations like that? Yeah, no, absolutely.


Jordan  

Absolutely. So there are two ways. So our retreats are for everyone. I want men to be part of the conversation. I think it was so important so integral for the conversation, to change and to shift is that you know, girls' education and government empowerment, it needs to need support from men as well. Because so much of you know, their destiny relates to how men engage with them and the teachers or fathers or brothers or colleagues and whatnot. And so I think like that's, that's vital. And then, so I was in Rwanda in February 2020. So it was the last trip, like right before the whole world shut down, and I did another incarnation of our on-the-ground teacher training, but it was mapped. So it was men and women. But what was so cool about it is that it was primary school teachers. And so have like, science teacher and PE teacher, just from from, you know, from the area that I was in. And it was interesting because it took time is here like, you know, like, you know, big like strong like, you know, like men and you know, kind of little skeptical of like, what's this yoga business, one of them even asking like, isn't it only for girls, but then it was great to see them really challenged by it. I especially like the balances and so kind of be a little bit humbled by it. But then also at the same time, you could see like the sense of like serenity across their faces, like at the end when we would be in like rest, or you know, doing kind of like for colds and you know, just how at the end of it, they said how much they really enjoyed it and how they were going to do it with their kids at home and they couldn't wait to you know, bring it into school, as well. And, you know, that was really fantastic to see and to witness.


Alex  

Yeah,That's something like if I was a kid, I wish we had had


Dydine  

a Wellness Center ?


Alex  

Yeah, I'm happy that these resources are available to everyone. Nowadays. I was an emotional kid, I was very emotional. I was like, I always needed to be able to express myself in some fashion. And yeah, I just think it's incredibly beneficial for people like you to exist in the work that you're doing. And to just reiterate that it's okay. Not only that, it's okay. But it's necessary for emotional intelligence. And just to be able to continue growing as a people, like as a species. It's essential and I'm happy that you're involved in this.



Dydine  

So what's next for you? There are a lot of people requesting to join but I don't know if you know of them. But I'm having our mutual friend come say hi to you. So how would you like for people to support you in your journey? Or how can they also begin a journey of helping others?


Jordan  

So no action is too little. I think maybe even if it's just taking your neighbor's mail or package if you live in an apartment building and like the meaning of it, like just be kind, you know, I think sometimes we think giving has to be this huge grandiose, you know, action. But really, I think it's just about maybe even like the smaller more subtle things that we can kind of weave into each and every day so that it doesn't feel so daunting and so overwhelming. In terms of you know, yoga, we have upcoming retreats. If anyone wants to join, we're going to Cape Town, South Africa, and February, February 18 to 25th. We're working with an incredible organization called the Lola and working with their female empowerment students doing art in yoga with them. So that's gonna be really incredible. And then also scheduled a retreat to Nicaragua in July so working with the girls, so people want to travel with us. You can also sign up for our mailing list. We are currently figuring out the rest of our 2023 calendar and then are on the ground teacher training program. We need funding for that so that we can continue our work in places like Rwanda and Morocco. We're also going to be doing it in Cape Town as well, with Lola staff, which I'm really excited about in February so the Donate link is in the link tree and we also have done a collaboration with Samara, and Porsche yoga. So we made these really beautiful or not Kamera on the parent and guardian cooperative. Parents of the elementary school not to Mara support is very cool like a holistic approach. They've designed maybe the making of yoga mats out if you want to take a little piece of Rwanda home-made with you, you know, made with love, for your practice, or for a loved one. It's a great stocking stuffer for the upcoming holidays. Yes. So check that out. Yeah, never too soon to do holiday shopping.


Alex  

Yeah, that's great.

You say right now you are living your dream? Do you feel like you're doing that right now activist?


Jordan  

I've never been one of those people who had like a five-year plan or like a 10-year plan. I think I've always been really like, as I said, like, fly by the seat of my pants. And kind of, you know, go slow. Everything is very, I don't want to say settled because that makes it seem stagnant. I have a great partner who's supportive and takes care of the dogs when I travel which is great. Dogs that I love very much you know, it's amazing incredible to be able to connect with both of you and you know, to continue to grow you know, my friendship circle and am very grateful for all of that.


Alex  

On that note we are joined by another beautiful soul.


Jordan  

The most beautiful.


Consolee  

Hi everybody!!

You are having beautiful conversations, also happy to see you being here.


Jordan  

Thank you for organizing this or introducing me and making friends.


Alex  

For all of us, I think in the Baserange community, over the last couple of years we've been forming this community and just embracing one another and embracing these conversations constantly speaking to everybody, Jordan you're kind of experiencing it right now for the first time, but it's really a focus of ours to give back to the community to share our togetherness and healing and that's what we're trying to do. That's all we're here for. So it is beautiful to have everybody experience everything both of you guys are doing.


Dydine  

I'm wondering if Consolee has a question for Jordan?



Consolee  

It’s just a very simple question. So I know she's wonderful she's helped a lot of these communities and I'm so inspired by her. She taught me a lot of you know, yoga pauses and all that. The work she's doing is necessary especially for communities where anywhere in the world to have yoga accessible. Like you were talking about earlier, they said Now, usually yoga was considered to be a luxury but it's important. Everybody needs healing and everybody needs it because it's part of you, it helps you to feel better within yourself. So I really love yoga, really, it's it and is so happy, especially in your wonder to go to Rwanda. You know, the community has run into what we have gone through and to see. And I was so moved every time she tells me stories of you know, what happened and the experience and it moved me a lot. So, my question is is there any word they taught you in Kinyarwanda, especially like in the yoga, take, for instance a word, you remember that they taught you in Kinyarwanda during the sessions like anything related to yoga? 


Jordan  

Yeah, so there's two, there's two are that I remember. Roho (Soul). We say yoga is an embodiment practice. It was when we brought together and emerged it's like with the kids like your mind, your body, and like your Roho.


Consolee  

That's beautiful.


Jordan  

The other one is, I'm gonna mispronounce it for a minute “Cyibuti”? What's the word for your bottom?


Console

You mean “kibuno” ?


Jordan

Yeah, that’s the word.


Dydine  

The word “butt” translated in Kinyarwanda, it doesn't sound appropriate. Does that make sense like appropriate because you have to. 


Jordan  

Like in England they say bum..


Dydine  

We have a session, it's called Wellness Wednesday. We constantly and Consolee, Alex and I we do a Wellness Wednesday, every Wednesday on Instagram live. Like we saw it on yours and we have something in common and you call it Izuba which means Sun.


Jordan  

Oh for the yoga mat. So we called the yoga mat Izuba, which means Sun, right?

I also remember Muraho and Murakoze.


Consolee  

So when am I going to see you in New York?


Jordan  

Hopefully next year, like early next year, but you should come to LA because I'll be in LA before you need to come to meet us all in our life. I know. 


Consolee  

absolutely. Yeah. So good to see you. And I'm so happy you had an amazing composition here. That was so beautiful. So thank


Jordan  

you so much. I miss you. I love you.


Dydine  

Thank you so much for trusting us with your words, your words we really feel humbled and honored to have been able to, be in the space this space. So thank you so much. And keep up the good work.


Jordan

I look forward to walking with you on the West Coast.



Alex

We're sorry if we have missed anybody's questions. But thank you so much for joining us on this beautiful conversation with Jordan and Consulee. Stay tuned for more lovely conversations more topics, growth, and community in the future. And thanks again for joining.